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I rest my case
07-18-2018, 04:55 PM,
#1
I rest my case
Well, that about finishes it up. There's sufficient evidence to cast doubt on the facts of the The Long Ride Home. Despite some desperate attempts to salvage the story from the dumps, it just doesn't hold air.

As John Brown examined, the dates don't work with either the last year of WWII or Forrest's summer trip to Atlanta when he purchased "The Bullet" and drove her home.

Gas rationing would have prohibited anyone without an exclusive permit to drive 1600 miles consuming 90+ gallons of gas over 40+ hours of driving.

Tire rationing would have made it illegal for the boys to collect tires if they could have even found any tires. Do all tires and rims fit every car anyway?
Americans were all in for supporting the war effort and did their part to conserve. Marvin aided the effort by donating metal during the metal salvaging campaign, so I'd speculate that he'd have no part of his kids defying American's war support efforts.

It's fine to put your head in the sand and hide from these glaring intentional errors in Forrest's memoir, because I understand that it's just hard to think about all this stuff AND to imagine that Forrest is making shit up. I know.





razyfamily
Reply
07-18-2018, 05:04 PM,
#2
RE: I rest my case
(07-18-2018, 04:55 PM)crazyfamily Wrote: Well, that about finishes it up. There's sufficient evidence to cast doubt on the facts of the The Long Ride Home. Despite some desperate attempts to salvage the story from the dumps, it just doesn't hold air.

As John Brown examined, the dates don't work with either the last year of WWII or Forrest's summer trip to Atlanta when he purchased "The Bullet" and drove her home.

Gas rationing would have prohibited anyone without an exclusive permit to drive 1600 miles consuming 90+ gallons of gas over 40+ hours of driving.

Tire rationing would have made it illegal for the boys to collect tires if they could have even found any tires. Do all tires and rims fit every car anyway?
Americans were all in for supporting the war effort and did their part to conserve. Marvin aided the effort by donating metal during the metal salvaging campaign, so I'd speculate that he'd have no part of his kids defying American's war support efforts.

It's fine to put your head in the sand and hide from these glaring intentional errors in Forrest's memoir, because I understand that it's just hard to think about all this stuff AND to imagine that Forrest is making shit up. I know.





razyfamily
This is why you keep your heads out of the books.

Sent from my LG-M153 using Tapatalk
Reply
07-18-2018, 05:18 PM,
#3
RE: I rest my case
(07-18-2018, 04:55 PM)crazyfamily Wrote: Well, that about finishes it up. There's sufficient evidence to cast doubt on the facts of the The Long Ride Home. Despite some desperate attempts to salvage the story from the dumps, it just doesn't hold air.

razyfamily

Crazyfamily

I have been fortunate enough to have discovered many “armchair” treasures valued at many tens of thousands of dollars, and I can assure you that you are absolutely right to review and question everything. Nothing is too small to know, and any chink that you can find in the armour of the huntsetter is valuable. The trick is to be thoughtful, logical and critical about what we research. I doubt that anyone will find Forrest’s treasure without looking beyond the poem, and that opinion is based on my fortunately successful experience.

Regards

Archer
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07-18-2018, 05:58 PM,
#4
RE: I rest my case
Forrest’s comment on after finding out he had Cancer, I wanted to run to Canada, or something like that
Made me believe your answers to finding the chest are not in The USA. Even though the chest is.
Reply
07-18-2018, 06:53 PM,
#5
I rest my case
@nmc, I pretty much agree. The stories are a vehicle, and that's why it's important to understand them. Forrest told us to read the book looking for things that might be hints. So, taking things at face value is counter productive to searching for the treasure. Forrest never suggested that we should ignore the book(though I think he did tell Stephanie that). This is a self imposed restriction by searchers who can't make sense of it. That's too bad, but where do they get off pretending to be any kind of authority? Sean is a self-proclaimed poem purist, so why does he think he gets any of this?

My intention was to challenge these vlogs that try to impose this authority on these subjects. So, Forrest gave a response, big whoop, but it was a good opportunity to show the flip side of their conventional wisdom. Now, isn't that funny.



razyfamily
Reply
07-18-2018, 07:10 PM,
#6
RE: I rest my case
I'm guessing the story is about 85% true.
Reply
08-06-2018, 07:12 AM,
#7
I rest my case
Quote:Once, I received a nice note from a seven-year-old-girl and it was so funny because it said, "My father thinks you're a fraud."



https://youtu.be/-oLzi4fpw_A

At about 17:50, just after discussing the Elmyr De Hory fakes that Forrest sold in his gallery, there's this:

[quote]Forrest: We're all charlatans to some degree, you know...about ourselves. I've thought at one time women are fakes themselves, you know... They wear lipstick and, and mascara, they're misrepresenting the product.

Lorraine Mills: Well, there's an art to that Forrest.

Forrest: Yes, and it propagates the thrill of the chase.

I beg your pardon? We're all charlatans? It propagates the thrill of the chase? Searchers love to quote Webster from time to time. You can look if you want, or not.



In The New Yorker, November 15, 1999, Douglass Preston tells the story of Forrest buying a cache of Clovis points from knapper Woody Blackwell. Forrest paid $15,000 for three points and another $85,000 for 9 more points. Attempting to authenticate the points revealed the presence of a Teflon-like material coating on the points. When it was discovered that another collector, Jeb Taylor, had also bought some points from Blackwell that exhibited the same Teflon-like coating, Forrest became uneasy about the purchase. Further testing found that the points displayed a yellow fluorescence under ultraviolet light indicating that they were recently knapped.

It was unmistakeable, the revered Clovis points were fakes.

Forrest wasn't hurt by the deception and said to Preston "Everyone said it coudn't be done...I think his motivation was to show these experts that he could do it. And he did."

Forrest got scammed for $100,000 and instead of becoming accusatory he showed appreciation for Blackwell's work. Jeb Taylor was "pissed about it...but at the same time I respected his ability, I actually congratulated him."



One time I asked Forrest how he felt about all of the ugly things that people were saying about him. He responded "it doesn't bother me, if it's true."

If anything is propagated in The Thrill of the Chase it is misinformation and mistruths.

Searchers always talk about the significance of reoccurring words and themes throughout TTOTC, yet this one is guarded like a deep family secret.



razyfamily
Reply
08-06-2018, 07:26 AM,
#8
I rest my case
[quote="crazyfamily" pid='204824' dateline='1533557521']
[quote]Once, I received a nice note from a seven-year-old-girl and it was so funny because it said, "My father thinks you're a fraud."[/quote]



https://youtu.be/-oLzi4fpw_A

At about 17:50, just after discussing the Elmyr De Hory fakes that Forrest sold in his gallery, there's this:

[quote]Forrest: We're all charlatans to some degree, you know...about ourselves. I've thought at one time women are fakes themselves, you know... They wear lipstick and, and mascara, they're misrepresenting the product.

Lorraine Mills: Well, there's an art to that Forrest.

Forrest: Yes, and it propagates the thrill of the chase.

I beg your pardon? We're all charlatans? It propagates the thrill of the chase? Searchers love to quote Webster from time to time. You can look if you want, or not.



In The New Yorker, November 15, 1999, Douglass Preston tells the story of Forrest buying a cache of Clovis points from knapper Woody Blackwell. Forrest paid $15,000 for three points and another $85,000 for 9 more points. Attempting to authenticate the points revealed the presence of a Teflon-like material coating on the points. When it was discovered that another collector, Jeb Taylor, had also bought some points from Blackwell that exhibited the same Teflon-like coating, Forrest became uneasy about the purchase. Further testing found that the points displayed a yellow fluorescence under ultraviolet light indicating that they were recently knapped.

It was unmistakeable, the revered Clovis points were fakes.

Forrest wasn't hurt by the deception and said to Preston "Everyone said it coudn't be done...I think his motivation was to show these experts that he could do it. And he did."

Forrest got scammed for $100,000 and instead of becoming accusatory he showed appreciation for Blackwell's work. Jeb Taylor was "pissed about it...but at the same time I respected his ability, I actually congratulated him."



One time I asked Forrest how he felt about all of the ugly things that people were saying about him. He responded "it doesn't bother me, if it's true."

If anything is propagated in The Thrill of the Chase it is misinformation and mistruths.

Searchers always talk about the significance of reoccurring words and themes throughout TTOTC, yet this one is guarded like a deep family secret.



razyfamily
[/quote]


And so we have “Sitting Bull’s pipe.”
Wonder how that looks under the UV light for wooden frauds. Lol.

Yes, I know it’s been “authenticated,” but I believe F wanted to prove something that couldn’t be done, could.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Mindy's blogs:

http://www.fennhotspot.com
http://www.myeverwonderland.blogspot.com
Reply
08-06-2018, 07:34 AM,
#9
I rest my case
I heard Forrest talk about people laughing at him when he said he has Sitting Bull's pipe, and I always wondered about that. He elaborated that, well, he "couldn't prove that Sitting Bull owned the pipe, but it is the pipe that he was holding."



razyfamily
Reply
08-06-2018, 09:02 AM,
#10
RE: I rest my case
He remembers driving back from Yellowstone to Temple, Texas with his football coach in 1946 when they dropped the bomb on Hiroshima. (Search for 1946 on tarryscant).

That's not a mistake. That's deliberate. I'm sure he can tell you the exact dates both the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs were dropped. Plus the bombs were dropped in August. In August of 1946 he claims to have been in Atlanta earning enough money to buy a car.

He also said "Well, if I don't know a good story, I'll just make up one."
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