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How far is too far
09-11-2015, 07:06 PM,
#21
RE: How far is too far
(09-05-2015, 01:45 PM)chrisclark1231 Wrote: Ok let us start with FF book To Far to Walk. In the prologue he states he went on a three day fishing trip in the Madison River in Yellowstone. He stated he walked 10 river miles and exited at Bakers Hole Campgrounds. I took the time to backtrack 10 river miles from Bakers Hole and wound up at the bridge that crosses the Madison in Yellowstone Park. He stated at the end of the story in the prologue that it is now, for him, To Far To Walk. Just as he stated in the poem, "not far, but to far to walk" Let us assume for a moment that he is telling us with the prologue that it is in Yellowstone. If so then where is the home of Brown and where the warm waters halt. From the bridge where he started his fishing walk it is very close to Madison Junction where the Firehole river merges with the Madison. The Firehole is constantly being warmed by multiple sources ( hence the plural "waters") of hot water bubbling up from underground. Once it merges with the Madison it cools. Now in between the the bridge and Madison Junction there are many pull offs. Some of them have signs telling visitors about trees, the fires, and one is specifically about Brown Trout. The home of Brown. Now lets jump to another statement in the poem. 2 actually. " Put in below the home of Brown" and "it will be worth he cold". If I am searching Yellowstone in August let us say, why would I be cold? Because FF doesnt mean "put in" a boat. He means put YOU in. That water is cold. I know I fell in it. So then the next question is do you walk up river, down river or across the river.... with 20 POUNDS OF GOLD? I wouldn't be walking up or down with 20 pounds of gold. Some of that water is deep and fast. Hence I would walk across. Now to some this may not be making much sense. Arent we supposed to follow the poem to it's end of the 10 river miles? to Bakers Hole? He did say "There’ll be no paddle up your creek,". Why? Because you don't need a boat. And "Just heavy loads and water high." a twenty pound load of gold and as I said the water is deep in spots. Then all of a sudden the trip just seems to stop in the poem. I always wondered about that. He just goes straight to the Blaze. From "Put in below the home of Brown" to "If you’ve been wise and found the blaze" We can't be expected to go upstream or down stream with twenty pounds of gold. We already talked about that. Then we have the statement "The end is ever drawing nigh;" coupled with everything else in that stanza at first read it sounds like your going up stream right. "The end is ever drawing nigh;" means your getting close, that's all that means. He has everyone seeing a rafting trip through rough "waters high" when in reality you are crossing a river with deep spots with a load of 40 pounds. You know FF never did say that the treasure was at the END of a boat trip. He did however say he got out of his car took two trips walking, one with the treasure and one with the box and it took all afternoon. He stated it's not on top of a mountain but might be close to the top. He stated it's somewhere an 80 year old and a child could go safely and "put in" cross the river below the home of Brown. Now.... where is the Blaze????? I believe I know but I am not telling. FF did say WHAT the Blaze is though.
Nice work.
Ω  200 ft. Club  Ω
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09-18-2015, 12:56 PM,
#22
RE: How far is too far
(09-05-2015, 01:45 PM)chrisclark1231 Wrote: Ok let us start with FF book To Far to Walk. In the prologue he states he went on a three day fishing trip in the Madison River in Yellowstone. He stated he walked 10 river miles and exited at Bakers Hole Campgrounds. I took the time to backtrack 10 river miles from Bakers Hole and wound up at the bridge that crosses the Madison in Yellowstone Park. He stated at the end of the story in the prologue that it is now, for him, To Far To Walk. Just as he stated in the poem, "not far, but to far to walk" Let us assume for a moment that he is telling us with the prologue that it is in Yellowstone. If so then where is the home of Brown and where the warm waters halt. From the bridge where he started his fishing walk it is very close to Madison Junction where the Firehole river merges with the Madison. The Firehole is constantly being warmed by multiple sources ( hence the plural "waters") of hot water bubbling up from underground. Once it merges with the Madison it cools. Now in between the the bridge and Madison Junction there are many pull offs. Some of them have signs telling visitors about trees, the fires, and one is specifically about Brown Trout. The home of Brown. Now lets jump to another statement in the poem. 2 actually. " Put in below the home of Brown" and "it will be worth he cold". If I am searching Yellowstone in August let us say, why would I be cold? Because FF doesnt mean "put in" a boat. He means put YOU in. That water is cold. I know I fell in it. So then the next question is do you walk up river, down river or across the river.... with 20 POUNDS OF GOLD? I wouldn't be walking up or down with 20 pounds of gold. Some of that water is deep and fast. Hence I would walk across. Now to some this may not be making much sense. Arent we supposed to follow the poem to it's end of the 10 river miles? to Bakers Hole? He did say "There’ll be no paddle up your creek,". Why? Because you don't need a boat. And "Just heavy loads and water high." a twenty pound load of gold and as I said the water is deep in spots. Then all of a sudden the trip just seems to stop in the poem. I always wondered about that. He just goes straight to the Blaze. From "Put in below the home of Brown" to "If you’ve been wise and found the blaze" We can't be expected to go upstream or down stream with twenty pounds of gold. We already talked about that. Then we have the statement "The end is ever drawing nigh;" coupled with everything else in that stanza at first read it sounds like your going up stream right. "The end is ever drawing nigh;" means your getting close, that's all that means. He has everyone seeing a rafting trip through rough "waters high" when in reality you are crossing a river with deep spots with a load of 40 pounds. You know FF never did say that the treasure was at the END of a boat trip. He did however say he got out of his car took two trips walking, one with the treasure and one with the box and it took all afternoon. He stated it's not on top of a mountain but might be close to the top. He stated it's somewhere an 80 year old and a child could go safely and "put in" cross the river below the home of Brown. Now.... where is the Blaze????? I believe I know but I am not telling. FF did say WHAT the Blaze is though.

Some good thinking there. When did he say what the blaze is?
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09-18-2015, 07:59 PM,
#23
RE: How far is too far
He did not say it took all afternoon. He said he did it in one afternoon. Maybe he drove 3 hours to his spot, got out and walked 500 feet to place the chest, went back and got the treasure, walked 500', placed the treasure, drove 3 hours back to his hotel, all in one afternoon. Big difference in interpretation. Just saying-
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09-21-2015, 11:49 AM,
#24
RE: How far is too far
I don't think TOO FAR TO WALK is a distance... Its a "mental thing" meaning... its just to much work to get myself to get up and go there again in those terms... Too Far to walk. Think about it for a second...

I used to ride my bike to the beach as a kid... Can I still do it? Sure I could ride a bike for 10 miles... But for me.. It's just too far to ride.
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09-21-2015, 08:27 PM,
#25
RE: How far is too far
You got this glock!...
Reply
10-16-2015, 08:32 PM,
#26
RE: How far is too far
(09-11-2015, 07:06 PM)decall Wrote:
(09-05-2015, 01:45 PM)chrisclark1231 Wrote: Ok let us start with FF book To Far to Walk. In the prologue he states he went on a three day fishing trip in the Madison River in Yellowstone. He stated he walked 10 river miles and exited at Bakers Hole Campgrounds. I took the time to backtrack 10 river miles from Bakers Hole and wound up at the bridge that crosses the Madison in Yellowstone Park. He stated at the end of the story in the prologue that it is now, for him, To Far To Walk. Just as he stated in the poem, "not far, but to far to walk" Let us assume for a moment that he is telling us with the prologue that it is in Yellowstone. If so then where is the home of Brown and where the warm waters halt. From the bridge where he started his fishing walk it is very close to Madison Junction where the Firehole river merges with the Madison. The Firehole is constantly being warmed by multiple sources ( hence the plural "waters") of hot water bubbling up from underground. Once it merges with the Madison it cools. Now in between the the bridge and Madison Junction there are many pull offs. Some of them have signs telling visitors about trees, the fires, and one is specifically about Brown Trout. The home of Brown. Now lets jump to another statement in the poem. 2 actually. " Put in below the home of Brown" and "it will be worth he cold". If I am searching Yellowstone in August let us say, why would I be cold? Because FF doesnt mean "put in" a boat. He means put YOU in. That water is cold. I know I fell in it. So then the next question is do you walk up river, down river or across the river.... with 20 POUNDS OF GOLD? I wouldn't be walking up or down with 20 pounds of gold. Some of that water is deep and fast. Hence I would walk across. Now to some this may not be making much sense. Arent we supposed to follow the poem to it's end of the 10 river miles? to Bakers Hole? He did say "There’ll be no paddle up your creek,". Why? Because you don't need a boat. And "Just heavy loads and water high." a twenty pound load of gold and as I said the water is deep in spots. Then all of a sudden the trip just seems to stop in the poem. I always wondered about that. He just goes straight to the Blaze. From "Put in below the home of Brown" to "If you’ve been wise and found the blaze" We can't be expected to go upstream or down stream with twenty pounds of gold. We already talked about that. Then we have the statement "The end is ever drawing nigh;" coupled with everything else in that stanza at first read it sounds like your going up stream right. "The end is ever drawing nigh;" means your getting close, that's all that means. He has everyone seeing a rafting trip through rough "waters high" when in reality you are crossing a river with deep spots with a load of 40 pounds. You know FF never did say that the treasure was at the END of a boat trip. He did however say he got out of his car took two trips walking, one with the treasure and one with the box and it took all afternoon. He stated it's not on top of a mountain but might be close to the top. He stated it's somewhere an 80 year old and a child could go safely and "put in" cross the river below the home of Brown. Now.... where is the Blaze????? I believe I know but I am not telling. FF did say WHAT the Blaze is though.
Nice work.

It is Awesome work and there's a lot to think about. And yes, this is WWWH for me, He loves the Madison River too much for it not to be.
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05-09-2017, 01:03 AM,
#27
RE: How far is too far
I'd say that having to walk the 7 mile road in with the bridge being out for cars was what he meant about to far to walk.

He mentioned a person riding a bike in there and getting it.

He also said Worth the Cold, Up Your Creek, and Put In Below The HOB

So would that mean that the bridge was out and too far too walk in from there, and that you should park at the HOB and cross there at the point where it goes right up the dry creek branch of the river?

That's what I saw after walking the 7 miles......lol

Just heavy loads and waters high...LOL

what a long walk after the bridge

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lTRkEjN5...31AOPFTeTp

He jokingly says to bring a flashlight and a sandwich....as he knew you would look for the bridge and try to walk in the LOOOOOONG way...

He is so funny how he sends you for the roundabout in a small area.
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05-09-2017, 02:42 AM,
#28
RE: How far is too far
Too Far To Watch....lol

Check this video out

https://youtu.be/zDvK5LDmtQA?list=PLGJkl...31AOPFTeTp

You'll see why its called that
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12-10-2017, 11:52 PM,
#29
RE: How far is too far
A typical person, before dying, will have walked thousands of miles. So I
don't think that this relates to the "search trip" distance "not far" being
longer than a person could actually walk. I think it relates to choosing
whether to walk or to use another mode of transportation, such as a motor vehicle.

In this treasure hunt, I believe that travel (say, in a car) during the "Not
far, but too far to walk" portion of the hunt means a kinda-short driving trip that would normally take less than about "a long day of driving". In fact,
my solution has this drive taking less than 4 hours.
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