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Did FF Actually Use the Term?
01-10-2017, 02:27 PM,
#11
RE: Did FF Actually Use the Term?
(01-10-2017, 02:08 PM)Mindy Wrote: I've never read Alice in Wonderland or seen the movie...I guess it's time to go down that rabbit hole...lol


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On the next movie night, we better watch Hopalong Cassidy in addition to me sleeping through Alice in Wonderland. Smile
-.-..The keeper of the key
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01-10-2017, 02:35 PM,
#12
Did FF Actually Use the Term?
I'd probably sleep through Alice in Wonderland, too...but I'll read the book and share notes as we watch Hopalong. Smile


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Mindy's blogs:

http://www.fennhotspot.com
http://www.myeverwonderland.blogspot.com
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01-10-2017, 05:08 PM,
#13
RE: Did FF Actually Use the Term?
(01-10-2017, 12:37 PM)The Wolf Wrote: Is it a coincidence that he called the "cable cutter" a guillotine (from his rescue) and the Queen of hearts words "Off with their heads?" Or is it just a "rabbit hole" within a rabbit hole?

"Cable cutters" are frequently called guillotines. Common usage.

Also, the "rabbit hole" term was used infrequently every now and then on the forum (I believe - but could be wrong) until about last June. The usage exploded after that -- I'm not sure why. I suspect it has something to do with everyone's frustration that the chase has gone on this long, and that every solve turns out to be wrong. I think a lot of people thought that this puzzle would have been solved last summer. I certainly did.
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01-10-2017, 05:31 PM, (This post was last modified: 01-10-2017, 07:56 PM by The Wolf.)
#14
RE: Did FF Actually Use the Term?
(01-10-2017, 05:08 PM)Beavertooth Wrote:
(01-10-2017, 12:37 PM)The Wolf Wrote: Is it a coincidence that he called the "cable cutter" a guillotine (from his rescue) and the Queen of hearts words "Off with their heads?" Or is it just a "rabbit hole" within a rabbit hole?

"Cable cutters" are frequently called guillotines. Common usage.
Are you citing this from your experience in flying rescue helos?

My assertion is based on my 7 years of flying rescue choppers - the term has alway been, "cable cutter" as per this emergency checklist samples
http://www.mdhelicopters.com/publication...ec10/hoist
https://www.uscg.mil/hq/cg5/cg534/nsarc/...3-2013.pdf
However, sometimes it is referred to the type of action i.e. "guillotine-type cable cutter" but still a " cable cutter switch" so maybe pilots call it something different in the USA, but would be considered slang.

I flew in a Jolly Green simulator once, but can't remember looking at the switch.
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01-11-2017, 12:36 AM,
#15
RE: Did FF Actually Use the Term?
Oh,the good old days when a rabbit was just sweet and innocent. A poem quote was just a funny little play on words. I am happy residing in those thoughts. Too complicated for my tastes out in the crazy world of golden treasures.
Shhh they aren't listening.
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01-11-2017, 03:53 AM, (This post was last modified: 01-11-2017, 03:55 AM by Beavertooth.)
#16
RE: Did FF Actually Use the Term?
(01-10-2017, 05:31 PM)The Wolf Wrote: Are you citing this from your experience in flying rescue helos?

My assertion is based on my 7 years of flying rescue choppers - the term has alway been, "cable cutter" as per this emergency checklist samples

Originally, learning to fly gliders back in the late 1960's. Gliders attached to cables that had to be cut if not released properly. Also used in sheet metal (Guillotine shear). Also used in paper cutters (from Wikipedia: "A paper cutter (also referred to as paper trimmer, paper guillotine or simply a guillotine) is a tool often found in offices and classrooms, designed to cut a large set of paper at once with a straight edge."). There are also much larger industrial paper cutters that use a straight down cut that are referred to as guillotines. ff's experiences in publishing books also may have involved him with paper cutting machines that could have been called guillotines.

I imagine that rescue chopper manuals today are dumbed down to an 8th grade reading level (by design), and that the word guillotine would be considered too confusing or not understood. This may not have been the case back in the 1960's and 1970's.

In any event, you can believe what you want. I was just pointing out that the word guillotine is fairly commonly used outside of being for taking people's heads off, and ff may have meant nothing by it.
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01-11-2017, 07:55 AM, (This post was last modified: 01-11-2017, 08:47 AM by The Wolf.)
#17
RE: Did FF Actually Use the Term?
BT, I have a glider license as well - in the glider case, it can be referred to as a guillotine but is still a cable cutter, however not for the rescue hoist of a Jolly Green. I am pointing out a small aberration and possible link to rabbit holed. This may one case where Fenn accidentally didn't use correct terminology and is not important since we are not required to have specialized knowledge (that is the best argument in this case).

This is the quote in question:

"Flight Engineer Master Sergeant Maples had his left hand on the "Guillotine," a cable-cutting device that would have allowed him to chop my line if the plane started taking battle damage or if I had somehow become irretrievably wrapped around a tree, endangering the helicopter and the crew."


But and its a big but, there is a significant amount of other information in TTOTC that supports this aberration, so yes I will keep it on the table.
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01-11-2017, 08:17 AM,
#18
RE: Did FF Actually Use the Term?
I also have a glider pilot licence, and never heard the term guillotine used. I noticed that when Forrest was talking about his tree-cutting job, he spoke about using a tarpaulin. But he pronounced it differently, as "tarpoleen", which rhymes with guillotine and kerosene.
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01-11-2017, 08:51 AM,
#19
RE: Did FF Actually Use the Term?
As far as how the rescue hoist cable cutter works, there is an explosive cartridge that is electrically activated that slams a knife into the cable and severing it clean. I only mention this, because of the "coincidence" of the Una-bomber topic in todays Forrest gets mail-11.
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01-11-2017, 12:40 PM, (This post was last modified: 01-11-2017, 12:52 PM by Beavertooth.)
#20
RE: Did FF Actually Use the Term?
(01-11-2017, 08:17 AM)TheTrueNorth Wrote: I also have a glider pilot licence, and never heard the term guillotine used. I noticed that when Forrest was talking about his tree-cutting job, he spoke about using a tarpaulin. But he pronounced it differently, as "tarpoleen", which rhymes with guillotine and kerosene.

Of course, you probably weren't in England learning to fly gliders being ground-launched by cables attached to barrage-balloon winches on the back of trucks. If the release didn't work, once you were directly overhead the truck, the cable started pulling you directly down onto the truck and the winch operator. The operator had a very quick trigger finger on the guillotine, I can assure you.

You are probably used to those nice airplane launches. Smile


_____
Edit: Note that the trucks did not move. The glider was launched into the air by the speed of the cable being wound up on the winch. The glider gained enough airspeed on the ground to launch itself upwards about 500 feet before it came even with the truck. After that, the cable would pull the glider directly downward.

(01-11-2017, 07:55 AM)The Wolf Wrote: But and its a big but, there is a significant amount of other information in TTOTC that supports this aberration, so yes I will keep it on the table.

If the poem is about two people, a historic one and ff, then it is possible that the historic one was guillotined.

Alternatively, for another historic personage, I posted "off with their heads" when E.C. Waters was talking about John the Baptist the other day, but I don't think anyone noticed what I was talking about.

[Warning: Mindy, please do not read the following sentence!] Also, if you think Guillotine is an aberration, then consider the paper cutting, book publishing comments I made as hints as to where he may have been "heading" with this.
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