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Recently rethinking home of Brown.
10-14-2014, 02:30 PM,
#21
Recently rethinking home of Brown.


<div class="bbcode_quote_head">Quote:
<b>Quote from Project Why on October 13, 2014, 6:24 pm</b>

As Chief Seattle said, "there is no place dedicated to solitude."



We are never truly alone and nothing is completely silent.



I often think of those things when I'm out exploring or even just driving down some road away from everything. Who came before us, ........and even before them? What events took place here in this very spot and what lives existed here? When I find a pottery sherd or a flint projectile or a mano used for grinding food, etc. or ........anything from the past, I am transferred to another place in time and circumstance within time and am able to relive what it was like, ........if only in my imagination. The truth, ........what really happened? Well, I guess only the trees, the grass and the home of brown really knows.........



There is a pleasure in the pathless woods,

There is a rapture on the lonely shore,

There is society, where none intrudes,

By the deep sea, and music in its roar:

I love not man the less, but Nature more,

From these our interviews, in which I steal

From all I may be, or have been before,

To mingle with the Universe, and feel

What I can ne'er express, yet cannot all conceal.



-- George Gordon Byron
</div>


We are never truly alone as we are part of the whole.

The whole which we call water.

The Hydra

The Hydration Nation.



The Hydrological Cycle goes something like this.



Begin at where warm waters halt

And take it in the canyon down

No far , but too far to walk

Put in below the home of Brown

From there it is no place for the meek

The end is ever drawing nigh

There will be no paddle up your creek

Just heavy loads and water high

If you have been wise

And found my blaze

Look quickly down your quest to cease



So what does your imagination see ?



The poem is an allegory of the cycle of water and if you follow that concept in your imagination , then you have sprung up in view of the treasure.



Be the force Luke !
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10-14-2014, 07:49 PM,
#22
Recently rethinking home of Brown.
Ok. Now pinpoint that to an exact place in The Rocky Mountains where to begin or in your case where the treasure is.

*******************************************************************
"But I'm tryin', Ringo. I'm tryin' real hard to be the shepherd." - Jules Winnfield
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08-07-2015, 08:10 PM, (This post was last modified: 08-07-2015, 09:33 PM by samsmith.)
#23
RE: Recently rethinking home of Brown.
I am about to suggest here another method of reading and interpreting FF's poem especially directed to the 8th(and also the 9th) line in this discussion, namely 'Put in below the home of Brown'...It is not my intention of messing with the poem, but to engage your brain in another possible way to group words or phrases and derive separate or diverging interpretations of FF's word play in his poem...I hope you will read and think deeply about other possibilities you may have overlooked...Discussion or criticism is appreciated as is staying on topic if you choose to reply...All is IMO of course and all I ask is that you think about it...

The word 'Brown' in the poem is capitalized specifically for the purpose of suggesting a proper noun...It is a diversionary tactic which has worked admirably...And prefacing it with 'the home of' has further encouraged an endless search for a specific domicile or place of habitation of a living entity of some sort...Nothing could be further from the truth IMO...It simply does not exist as a place on the landscape that will aid you in coming closer to the treasure location...Not to say it doesn't have significance on another level...I can see where it may have a duality of meaning once you arrive on site...FF has not intentionally misdirected you but he will allow you to lead yourself astray...It's part of his game, his rules...

So, if FF has said that everything you needed to locate the treasure is in the poem then then 'home of Brown' is in the poem...This is 'Brown's residence...This is where 'Brown' lives and here only...'the home of Brown' won't be found on a map or on the landscape...Its home is right where you see it and must not change nor move out of its place("Don't mess with my poem!")...

There is hidden purpose behind the grammatical location of the WORD 'Brown' and capitalization is simply not significant, just as 'answer(s)' being singular or plural in the 5th stanza makes no difference in interpreting the poem(IMO this particular line, #19 may be discarded entirely, BUT that is another topic & another time!)...Focusing on and devoting so much research and discussion to this simple 4 word phrase has successfully diverted virtually all attention from the important words in this line, which are - 'Put in below'...Important IMO to finding the search location which FF has hidden in his poem...

Dropping 'below the home of Brown'(in the poem) to the next line we find the words 'From there' and 'it's no place for the meek'...All one line of the stanza of course but you will notice I divided the wording where a comma may possibly have created a more grammatically correct pause and better sentence structure if reading the line as a full sentence in itself had occurred(When beginning a sentence with an adverb or a prepositional phrase, a comma may separate it from the subject and verb.)...See?...Just bear with me here for a moment...

Accepting that Brown's home is right where you see it(for now), we can take the words 'Put in below' and pair them with the first words of the next(9th) line 'From there' to obtain a reading as - 'put in below from there'...This is 'below the home of Brown', so what/where are we 'putting' in from?...I would suggest that this is hidden in the word 'there'...So what do we find in or may we take from this word that may possibly be of significance?...Go deep out of the box to see if you can discover this for yourself...IMO it is vital that you first - find the 'key', find the one and only wwwh, follow the instructions given and it may show itself to you...These are also in the poem as FF said...

The remaining words of line 9 - '...it's no place for the meek' may also be READ as a complete sentence in itself regardless of FF's choice in punctuating the stanza...For instance, the choice of a semicolon after the second line when EACH line of the 3rd stanza #9 ->#12 could stand alone as a complete sentence...This phrase also carries hidden significance in approaching 'The end is ever drawing nigh'(duality of meaning again)...Remember: the poem is very carefully constructed by an architect who worked long and hard on its structure to achieve a cloak of invisibility to conceal what lies hidden within the poem; namely, the location of the treasure chest...

We must pull back this cloak to unveil the secret interior...To do so you must find the method FF employed to hide this information...It appears as a thing of beauty when finally disclosed...

Comments??... Smile
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08-13-2015, 11:35 PM,
#24
RE: Recently rethinking home of Brown.
(08-07-2015, 08:10 PM)samsmith Wrote: I am about to suggest here another method of reading and interpreting FF's poem especially directed to the 8th(and also the 9th) line in this discussion, namely 'Put in below the home of Brown'...It is not my intention of messing with the poem, but to engage your brain in another possible way to group words or phrases and derive separate or diverging interpretations of FF's word play in his poem...I hope you will read and think deeply about other possibilities you may have overlooked...Discussion or criticism is appreciated as is staying on topic if you choose to reply...All is IMO of course and all I ask is that you think about it...

The word 'Brown' in the poem is capitalized specifically for the purpose of suggesting a proper noun...It is a diversionary tactic which has worked admirably...And prefacing it with 'the home of' has further encouraged an endless search for a specific domicile or place of habitation of a living entity of some sort...Nothing could be further from the truth IMO...It simply does not exist as a place on the landscape that will aid you in coming closer to the treasure location...Not to say it doesn't have significance on another level...I can see where it may have a duality of meaning once you arrive on site...FF has not intentionally misdirected you but he will allow you to lead yourself astray...It's part of his game, his rules...

So, if FF has said that everything you needed to locate the treasure is in the poem then then 'home of Brown' is in the poem...This is 'Brown's residence...This is where 'Brown' lives and here only...'the home of Brown' won't be found on a map or on the landscape...Its home is right where you see it and must not change nor move out of its place("Don't mess with my poem!")...

There is hidden purpose behind the grammatical location of the WORD 'Brown' and capitalization is simply not significant, just as 'answer(s)' being singular or plural in the 5th stanza makes no difference in interpreting the poem(IMO this particular line, #19 may be discarded entirely, BUT that is another topic & another time!)...Focusing on and devoting so much research and discussion to this simple 4 word phrase has successfully diverted virtually all attention from the important words in this line, which are - 'Put in below'...Important IMO to finding the search location which FF has hidden in his poem...

Dropping 'below the home of Brown'(in the poem) to the next line we find the words 'From there' and 'it's no place for the meek'...All one line of the stanza of course but you will notice I divided the wording where a comma may possibly have created a more grammatically correct pause and better sentence structure if reading the line as a full sentence in itself had occurred(When beginning a sentence with an adverb or a prepositional phrase, a comma may separate it from the subject and verb.)...See?...Just bear with me here for a moment...

Accepting that Brown's home is right where you see it(for now), we can take the words 'Put in below' and pair them with the first words of the next(9th) line 'From there' to obtain a reading as - 'put in below from there'...This is 'below the home of Brown', so what/where are we 'putting' in from?...I would suggest that this is hidden in the word 'there'...So what do we find in or may we take from this word that may possibly be of significance?...Go deep out of the box to see if you can discover this for yourself...IMO it is vital that you first - find the 'key', find the one and only wwwh, follow the instructions given and it may show itself to you...These are also in the poem as FF said...

The remaining words of line 9 - '...it's no place for the meek' may also be READ as a complete sentence in itself regardless of FF's choice in punctuating the stanza...For instance, the choice of a semicolon after the second line when EACH line of the 3rd stanza #9 ->#12 could stand alone as a complete sentence...This phrase also carries hidden significance in approaching 'The end is ever drawing nigh'(duality of meaning again)...Remember: the poem is very carefully constructed by an architect who worked long and hard on its structure to achieve a cloak of invisibility to conceal what lies hidden within the poem; namely, the location of the treasure chest...

We must pull back this cloak to unveil the secret interior...To do so you must find the method FF employed to hide this information...It appears as a thing of beauty when finally disclosed...

Comments??... Smile
I can say as IMO... that they're definitely is a reason for the capitalization of Brown. No Brown canyons, no Clara Brown, no Molly Brown, no Brown trout. It is actually capitalized for two reasons. Layer 1 and Layer 2. Each one points to each other.
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08-15-2015, 08:56 PM,
#25
RE: Recently rethinking home of Brown.
Bunch of dumbazzzzs- Mr. Jack Brown built his home in 19xx.
Why do you write this drivel- Try some honest research, and quit guessing, and writing junk. Please-
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08-20-2015, 02:39 AM,
#26
RE: Recently rethinking home of Brown.
Why Mr. Jack Brown?
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08-22-2015, 07:39 PM, (This post was last modified: 08-23-2015, 12:10 PM by ItsAllMine.)
#27
RE: Recently rethinking home of Brown.
Santa Fe is the home of Fenn, so it was put in above the home of Fenn and below the home of Brown.

I'd say more but I don't want to give the local troll any hints.
The FeΩΩatic
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09-13-2015, 06:57 PM,
#28
Recently rethinking home of Brown.
Brown Recluse Spider
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09-15-2015, 11:08 AM,
#29
RE: Recently rethinking home of Brown.
The neglected home that is now patrolled by Brown Griz... and Brown Trout, oh, and add Brown or Golden Eagles... Air, Ground, and Water covered..
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07-01-2017, 12:52 PM,
#30
RE: Recently rethinking home of Brown.
Fenn has said that the treasure does not "relate to a structure" so if "Home of Brown" does not relate to a structure, that could mean that home likely means origin or beginning of. In that sense, we are left with "Origin of Brown" and for Fenn, an art collector, this likely refers to brown's origin, a sort of pigment. I've read several of the brown pigments from nature, and I must say it has some interesting connotations. What do you folks think of this theory?
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