Not logged in. Login - Register


All new registrations need to be approved manually. After registration, mail me at tyblossom at aol dot com.
ChaseChat is available for Smartphones via Tapatalk, Download the app at http://tapatalk.com/m?id=4&referer=1048173. After installing CLICK HERE to add the forum to Tapatalk.

Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
I'm bored. I can't watch NFL, and I already have a perfect solve
10-11-2017, 11:26 AM,
#21
RE: I'm bored. I can't watch NFL, and I already have a perfect solve
(10-10-2017, 05:13 PM)Milan Wrote:
(10-10-2017, 03:39 PM)FennMaster Wrote: I can't believe you brought up such a controversial topic on chasechat.
I don't believe for a second that you have a perfect solve. Smile
Agree about NFL though, still too hard to not watch.

Well, that's why this thread is in the therapy room - almost anything goes in here.

>>"still too hard to not watch"

Which team is your favorite?

The controversial thing I was talking about was you saying you have a perfect solve, which I believe you have said outside the therapy room. Smile

I grew up in Minnesota so I am a die hard Vikings fan (Yeah I know, you're right it is painful). I remain a fan in spite of their lack of success. I love coach Zimmer, and I don't think he would tolerate anyone kneeling. As far as I know, no Viking has knelt during the anthem(although I haven't seen the start of every game), they have locked arms. I agree the kneeling is disrespectful; there are corrupt cops out there, but disrespecting all of the other great police officers and military people who put their lives on the line on a daily basis for the actions of a few should not be tolerated.

I'm sure you've heard the new story out about the NFL owners meeting to change the rule from "should" stand to "must" stand during the anthem. I hope it goes through, and it puts a stop to these hypocrite millionaires kneeling because life has been so unfair.

PS A chiefs fan? Returning that Chief's sweatshirt this season must have been a tough thing to do. Must be really tough to not watch the best team in football. Hats off to you.
Reply
10-11-2017, 03:03 PM,
#22
I'm bored. I can't watch NFL, and I already have a perfect solve
I find it so totally ironic how modern conservatives, who breathed new life into movements like The Tea Party, love touting the accomplishments of our founding fathers while attempting to school liberals on the true intent of the constitution. All have forgotten events like "the destruction of the tea" and the way that protest is who we are and how it has shaped our country even when it goes against our own values. Protest is who we are.

http://arsenalfordemocracy.com/2014/06/0...tea-party/


razyfamily
Reply
10-11-2017, 06:55 PM,
#23
RE: I'm bored. I can't watch NFL, and I already have a perfect solve
@crazyfamily...

Wow, you're so deceived, imo.

I'll answer this inline...

>>Listen here, little buddy.

Is this your feeble attempt at dominance?

>>...Our "democratically adopted rules" that you profess your love to, guarantee each individual, each citizen of this country the same inalienable rights.

Have I said anything to the contrary?

>>It's not a piece of fabric, or a melody, or geography('Im assuming this refers to team affiliation) it's the Constitution of the United States of America that guarantees these rights.

Again, have I said anything that contradicts this? And by geography, I meant exactly that. As in loving the mountains, streams, valleys, plains, swamps, etc.

>>...I am an American and I support the players and coaches and owners who stand against social injustice.

I'm glad we agree. But how someone stands against social injustice is the issue. Also, what if this person is simply wrong in their perception, and is therefore guilty of the same social injustice for which they accuse others?

>>I will not choose blind faith in an imaginary reality over the truth, ever.

No idea what you are implying here.

>>You can choose for yourself what disrespects you, but the authority of your opinion stops there.

To what authority do you refer here?

>>Look here, Police, Congressmen and women, Governors, Military leaders, the President, they work for us, they work for me and I am empowered by my constitution to hold them to the letter of the law, our law, guaranteed by the Constitution of the United States, Federal law, my state constitution and my state laws.

Again, we agree. However, there is no law or first amendment right that allows an employee (or contract employee) to do or say whatever they want while representing an organization without the possibility of getting reprimanded or fired. I'm sure you'll look up some collective bargaining language to dispute, but that's a topic I don't wish to get into.

>>Like I said before, I'm perfectly capable of choosing sides, and I'm prepared to fight for it, but I'd like to think we can find common ground. I have no control over you and your decisions.

Yes, we agree.

>>Now, protest is just that. I assume that you mean a symbolic spitting in your face when you say "my anger is about those ingrates who are basically spitting in our faces" since no one actually spit in you face.

You got me. Cop-hater didn't actually spit in my face.

>>...I think Colin is thinking the same thing just on a much bigger scale. I don't feel the need to advertise myself or my opinions but I will defend them, and I think Colin thinks the same way.

Yes. This is America. He can protest however he wants (legally) - I never diagreed with this - but he, and the others should risk being fired by the organization / brand they represent.

>>"I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color."

Yes, he has the right to his sentiment. But how he chooses to display this sentiment is what we're discussing.

Up till now, I haven't even mentioned what he was protesting - you did. My problem is that he, and many of the other NFL ingrates are spitting in my face (figuratively) because I'm "oppressing black people". How exactly am I doing this? How exactly are the cops doing this? How exactly is America doing this? We had a black president for 8 years, so I'm a little confused. I think the majority of NFL players are black, so how are they being oppressed there? I don't enjoy being lumped into the group - "country that oppresses black people".

>>"To me, this is bigger than football and it would be selfish on my part to look the other way. There are bodies in the street and people getting paid leave and getting away with murder."

Getting away with murder - wow - you must be joking here? My first sentence is even more correct - you're so deceived, imo.
______________________________________
Full disclosure: everything I wrote above is IMO.
Reply
10-11-2017, 11:30 PM, (This post was last modified: 10-11-2017, 11:47 PM by crazyfamily.)
#24
I'm bored. I can't watch NFL, and I already have a perfect solve
@crazyfamily...

Wow, you're so deceived, imo.

I'll answer this inline...

>>Listen here, little buddy.

Is this your feeble attempt at dominance?

No, you were condescending to me and I'm returning the favor.

>>...Our "democratically adopted rules" that you profess your love to, guarantee each individual, each citizen of this country the same inalienable rights.

Have I said anything to the contrary?

Apparently, rich sports guys on TV don't have feelings like everyone else.

>>It's not a piece of fabric, or a melody, or geography('Im assuming this refers to team affiliation) it's the Constitution of the United States of America that guarantees these rights.

Again, have I said anything that contradicts this? And by geography, I meant exactly that. As in loving the mountains, streams, valleys, plains, swamps, etc.

Your comments come off as an intent to change laws that will result in legal grounds for termination over "flag protests." Of course, this was settled a while ago by the Supreme Court. Texas v. Johnson

>>...I am an American and I support the players and coaches and owners who stand against social injustice.

I'm glad we agree. But how someone stands against social injustice is the issue. Also, what if this person is simply wrong in their perception, and is therefore guilty of the same social injustice for which they accuse others?

How someone stands against social injustice is the issue? That's the thing about freedom of speech, its free and needs to remain that way. There is a short list already of things that are not protected speech, kneeling at a football game doesn't come close to making the list.

What if the person is simply wrong in their perception and is therefore guilty of then same social injustice for which they accuse others? Excuse me? Did Colin Kaepernick shoot someone. No, he did not. Are you the opinion police?


>>I will not choose blind faith in an imaginary reality over the truth, ever.

No idea what you are implying here.

I'm implying that you guys are focused on the wrong thing. If unarmed people weren't being gunned down by police without accountability there would be no kneeling in protest.

>>You can choose for yourself what disrespects you, but the authority of your opinion stops there.

To what authority do you refer here?

Your'e not the boss of me, and I think Kaepernick has done the best thing he knew that would bring attention to the issue.

>>Look here, Police, Congressmen and women, Governors, Military leaders, the President, they work for us, they work for me and I am empowered by my constitution to hold them to the letter of the law, our law, guaranteed by the Constitution of the United States, Federal law, my state constitution and my state laws.

Again, we agree. However, there is no law or first amendment right that allows an employee (or contract employee) to do or say whatever they want while representing an organization without the possibility of getting reprimanded or fired. I'm sure you'll look up some collective bargaining language to dispute, but that's a topic I don't wish to get into.

Like I said, Trump wants them to fire football players, BFD. They still have to follow the laws and there could be some problems, but you didn't read any of that stuff.

>>Like I said before, I'm perfectly capable of choosing sides, and I'm prepared to fight for it, but I'd like to think we can find common ground. I have no control over you and your decisions.

Yes, we agree.

That's good to know because I'm starting to worry about this place.

>>Now, protest is just that. I assume that you mean a symbolic spitting in your face when you say "my anger is about those ingrates who are basically spitting in our faces" since no one actually spit in you face.

You got me. Cop-hater didn't actually spit in my face.

Peaceful protest is the right way to do it.

>>...I think Colin is thinking the same thing just on a much bigger scale. I don't feel the need to advertise myself or my opinions but I will defend them, and I think Colin thinks the same way.

Yes. This is America. He can protest however he wants (legally) - I never diagreed with this - but he, and the others should risk being fired by the organization / brand they represent.

They do risk being fired, and I never said that wasn't the case. I think there could be some legal problems due to the nature of their employment. If you'd bothered to read any of the information about this you would have found that if NFL players are even partially working under government contract then there are problems. Players were not required to be on the field during the national anthem until 2009 when the NFL began receiving payment for Military displays on the field. Standing on the field portrayed the players as being more patriotic. I included the link to McCain's letter above. Here's one thats more like spoon feeding.
http://www.snopes.com/nfl-sideline-anthem/


>>"I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color."

Yes, he has the right to his sentiment. But how he chooses to display this sentiment is what we're discussing.

And it's been a lovely conversation.

Up till now, I haven't even mentioned what he was protesting - you did. My problem is that he, and many of the other NFL ingrates are spitting in my face (figuratively) because I'm "oppressing black people". How exactly am I doing this? How exactly are the cops doing this? How exactly is America doing this? We had a black president for 8 years, so I'm a little confused. I think the majority of NFL players are black, so how are they being oppressed there? I don't enjoy being lumped into the group - "country that oppresses black people".

No one has said that you are oppressing black people. Police are killing unarmed black people, that's the issue.

If America allows the brazen disregard for the civil rights of black Americans by failing to bring officers to justice, then America is complicit.

Really? You're confused?

I'm sure you don't like being lumped into that group, neither do NFL players who are protesting police brutality like being lumped into your misconception of the issue.

This is about civil injustice propagated by bad police officers in bad police departments.


>>"To me, this is bigger than football and it would be selfish on my part to look the other way. There are bodies in the street and people getting paid leave and getting away with murder."

Getting away with murder - wow - you must be joking here? My first sentence is even more correct - you're so deceived, imo.

I didn't say that. That is part of Colin Kaepernick's statement following his preseason protests from 2016. But I stand with Colin, police are killing unarmed black kids with impunity, and all that many Americans can focus on is how disrespectful it is to the flag to kneel during the National Anthem. They won't consider the possibility that the brutality real.

BTW, I have a perfect general solve to.







razyfamily
Reply
10-12-2017, 06:02 AM, (This post was last modified: 10-12-2017, 06:19 AM by Milan.)
#25
RE: I'm bored. I can't watch NFL, and I already have a perfect solve
(10-11-2017, 11:30 PM)crazyfamily Wrote: ...But I stand with Colin, police are killing unarmed black kids with impunity, and all that many Americans can focus on is how disrespectful it is to the flag to kneel during the National Anthem. They won't consider the possibility that the brutality real.

Yes. That's definitely a tragedy. Unfortunately, we only hear about the few incidents that go horribly wrong, or when the press decides to purposely misreport the facts of an incident in order to incite popular anger over race or religion (happens a lot). Once this happens, the social injustice theme overwhelms common sense.

But does the tragedy of guilty-because-I'm-black need to cause prominent people to blame an entire country of patriotic, and even sympathetic people, many of whom are in their graves because they died fighting for America so that people like Colin can get paid large sums of money to play a popular game?

>>BTW, I have a perfect general solve to.

Awesome - let's end the Chase once and for all!

(10-11-2017, 11:26 AM)FennMaster Wrote: ...I grew up in Minnesota so I am a die hard Vikings fan...

Vikings were my favorite team when I was a kid - and I grew up in Toledo Smile I remember being a huge fan of Fran Tarkenton back in the 70's.

(10-11-2017, 11:26 AM)FennMaster Wrote: PS A chiefs fan?...Must be really tough to not watch the best team in football. Hats off to you.

Yes, it's not fair or fun. My family is not happy about it, especially my 9 year old son who just started playing football this Fall. I told them that the Chiefs were probably going to the Superbowl this year, but that until the Chiefs get rid of Marcus Peters (who is one of the best cornerbacks out there), that we won't be watching.

Cheers!

Milan
______________________________________
Full disclosure: everything I wrote above is IMO.
Reply
10-12-2017, 08:12 AM,
#26
RE: I'm bored. I can't watch NFL, and I already have a perfect solve
Police misconduct (which includes targeting minorities) is serious. I think the NFL players, by kneeling, have distracted attention from the problem by becoming the issue. Deliberate disrespect for national symbols creates a visceral reaction in many viewers, who don't care what the protest is about or why it's being done. The players aren't changing minds, since there's no specific visual connection to their cause.

However, some good may come of it - perhaps taxpayers will refuse to further subsidize big time sports and pay for the massive stadiums.

And no sense getting excited about the Chiefs - they'll have the best record in the AFC, then lose to a 9-7 team in the first round of playoffs - as usual.
Reply
10-12-2017, 08:36 AM,
#27
I'm bored. I can't watch NFL, and I already have a perfect solve
(10-12-2017, 08:12 AM)old drum Wrote: Police misconduct (which includes targeting minorities) is serious. I think the NFL players, by kneeling, have distracted attention from the problem by becoming the issue. Deliberate disrespect for national symbols creates a visceral reaction in many viewers, who don't care what the protest is about or why it's being done. The players aren't changing minds, since there's no specific visual connection to their cause.

However, some good may come of it - perhaps taxpayers will refuse to further subsidize big time sports and pay for the massive stadiums.

And no sense getting excited about the Chiefs - they'll have the best record in the AFC, then lose to a 9-7 team in the first round of playoffs - as usual.


It's sadly true, but is also a sad statement on the mentality of our citizenry. I believe this galvanization began with Reagan and the firing of air traffic controllers back in the eighties. Instead of looking for an understanding of what ails us, we just want to blow it off the map. We need to look for the problems and negotiate solutions, but to many Americans, compromise is a four letter word. Building a ridiculous wall is a perfect example of the divisiveness that will be our end. If we can even build that thing, it's not going to work any better than the pieces of the one that we have. Divisive leaders will be the end of US, and for the time being we can't even see this.

Ive said for a long while that Karl Marx had it wrong...Football is the opium of the people. Look now what happens when politics pervades football, the country has gone mad. Americans don't care as much about Catholic Priests molesting children as they do about NFL players disrespecting the flag. Don't mess with Americans and their drugs.

That's funny. KC is my natural enemy, but they're a damn good team.


razyfamily
Reply
10-12-2017, 12:16 PM,
#28
RE: I'm bored. I can't watch NFL, and I already have a perfect solve
(10-12-2017, 08:36 AM)crazyfamily Wrote: ..I believe this galvanization began with Reagan and the firing of air traffic controllers back in the eighties. Instead of looking for an understanding of what ails us, we just want to blow it off the map. We need to look for the problems and negotiate solutions...

Reagan was a great leader, and got elected in a landslide because he represented the majority of American people who wanted someone to actually do something to fix a bad situation (e.g. give us back the hostages or else, repair our military, etc.).

Same with Trump - half of us voted for him (please spare me the popular vote argument) because at the very least he wants to take real action to solve our common sense problems. In the face of powerful internal enemies (e.g. the media and the Republican swamp) and their silent coup attempts, at least his goals are admirable.

Perhaps you would prefer a leader who out of the gate travels the world apologizing for our colonization-mindset and all the sins of our country for the past 200 years?

>>We need to look for the problems and negotiate solutions...

Like we did with Iran? Like we did with North Korea? Really? I'm still laughing when I recall listening to John Kerry claim the Iran deal was "AN HISTORIC EVENT" - Wow - so out of touch!
______________________________________
Full disclosure: everything I wrote above is IMO.
Reply
10-12-2017, 12:22 PM, (This post was last modified: 10-12-2017, 12:23 PM by Copper.)
#29
I'm bored. I can't watch NFL, and I already have a perfect solve
Well said Old Drum. And then the Patriots will come out of nowhere and Brady will throw for 5 touchdowns. I'd love to hate him......but he's just so damn beautiful.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Reply
10-12-2017, 02:41 PM,
#30
RE: I'm bored. I can't watch NFL, and I already have a perfect solve
(10-12-2017, 06:02 AM)Milan Wrote: Vikings were my favorite team when I was a kid - and I grew up in Toledo Smile I remember being a huge fan of Fran Tarkenton back in the 70's.

Sounds like you stopped being a Vikings fan about the right time. There hasn't been much upside since Fran. So painful.
Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Buying the Perfect Road Trip Vehicle - Chevy Tahoe glock20 2 1,011 07-25-2016, 09:54 AM
Last Post: glock20
  800,000 on Terrorist Watch lists?! We allow them to be here!?? glock20 0 431 06-23-2016, 03:00 PM
Last Post: glock20

Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)
Contact Us | ChaseChat - Forrest Fenn's Forum | Return to Top | | Lite (Archive) Mode | RSS Syndication