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Re-posted idea
11-15-2017, 03:53 PM, (This post was last modified: 11-15-2017, 03:55 PM by fundamental design.)
#31
RE: Re-posted idea
(11-15-2017, 02:04 PM)FennMaster Wrote:
(11-15-2017, 08:14 AM)fundamental design Wrote:
(11-14-2017, 01:27 PM)FennMaster Wrote:
(11-14-2017, 01:19 PM)Sourdough Wrote:
(11-14-2017, 11:06 AM)FennMaster Wrote: I don't see assembling a bicycle as a very good analogy.
I wouldn't say “All you need to assemble this bicycle are the instructions,”.
Anyone that would say that would be mistaken because of course you need tools to assemble a bike.

The person who wrote the poem and hid the treasure said:
“All of the information you need to find the treasure is in the poem. ”
The poem contains the instructions for finding the tc, it makes no mention of tools needed, I made no mention of tools, the tools for solving the poem are your brain and a map to record the solution on (a computer can be helpful, of course);

The point is, all the information needed to find the treasure is in the poem,
there is no need for ff's books, scrapbooks, etc. (Forrest implies it in the quote)
I never said those things couldn't be helpful, if you're having trouble with the poem, only that they aren't needed.

Agree! Someone could use only the poem to find the chest. The trick is interpreting each of his clues in the correct way (location, direction, imagination, knowledge).

Forrest said TTOTC would be helpful—that there are a couple of good hints and a couple of aberrations. I was able to confirm a primary clue immediately after reading TTOTC for the first time because I understood his frame of reference for that line in the poem.

Using only the poem is possible but why not take advantage of the resources he recommended to speed up the process? Why make something hard even more difficult?

I agree that those things could help speed up the process, if you're having trouble solving the poem.
There is no guarantee using those things is going to speed up the process;
in fact it could be argued that it will make getting to the solution take longer, and in doing so make the entire process more difficult.

Well, we do have these f statements that may tip the balance one way...

"Well in my book there is a poem and there are 9 clues in the poem and the clues are in consecutive order; If you want to find the treasure chest, you have my book there, I'll tell you how to do it. Read the book just normally, the poem and the rest of the book, then go back and read the poem 6,8,10 times, study every line, every word, then after you do that read the book again slowly with the idea of looking for clues or hints that are in the book that will help you follow the clues. You can find the chest with just the clues, but there are hints in the book that will help you with the clues." ff -- Report From Santa Fe with Lorene Mills(May 13-16th 2011).

"What I tell people to do…if you’re really serious about looking for the treasure…get ‘The Thrill of the Chase’ and read it and then go back and read the poem over and over and over again. And then go back and read the book again, but slowly looking at every little abstract thing that might catch up in your brain, that might be a hint to help you with the clues. Any part of some is better than no part of any.” ff -- Moby Dickens Book Shop in Taos/11-2-13.

I really see that as saying the same thing I did, except it is a little bit more buried in his statement.
He says "You can find the chest with just the clues, but there are hints in the book that will help you with the clues."

So like I said you can find the chest using just the clues in the poem.
The hints in the book, if you can find and decipher those, will help you with the clues.
Whether or not that speeds things up, slows things down, makes things easier or more difficult depends on whether or not you're able to solve the clues in the poem very easily and whether or not you are able to find the hints you need while reading the book, or you end up going down a hundred different rabbit holes by reading the book.
I really don't see those statements as tipping the scales one way or the other, the argument is still the same.

I believe f’s statements do tip the scales towards the hints route being easier. If I’m wrong, oh well. Lol

When someone, who is an expert on a subject, explains their best advice for tackling a problem I’d think there’s a good reason why that is their best advice. It could simply be that f thinks that the hints are easier to figure out (and hence the correct starting point to clue 1) than finding the correct starting point from the poem. That is a common sense answer as to why the hints route may be easier. That’s all it takes to tip the scales in the favor of the hints for me because you don’t hear often the huge amount of rabbit holes that exist with just trying to figure out the poem by itself. That number, or time, is greater, imo.
-.-..The keeper of the key
Reply
11-15-2017, 04:22 PM,
#32
RE: Re-posted idea
(11-15-2017, 03:53 PM)fundamental design Wrote:
(11-15-2017, 02:04 PM)FennMaster Wrote:
(11-15-2017, 08:14 AM)fundamental design Wrote:
(11-14-2017, 01:27 PM)FennMaster Wrote:
(11-14-2017, 01:19 PM)Sourdough Wrote: Agree! Someone could use only the poem to find the chest. The trick is interpreting each of his clues in the correct way (location, direction, imagination, knowledge).

Forrest said TTOTC would be helpful—that there are a couple of good hints and a couple of aberrations. I was able to confirm a primary clue immediately after reading TTOTC for the first time because I understood his frame of reference for that line in the poem.

Using only the poem is possible but why not take advantage of the resources he recommended to speed up the process? Why make something hard even more difficult?

I agree that those things could help speed up the process, if you're having trouble solving the poem.
There is no guarantee using those things is going to speed up the process;
in fact it could be argued that it will make getting to the solution take longer, and in doing so make the entire process more difficult.

Well, we do have these f statements that may tip the balance one way...

"Well in my book there is a poem and there are 9 clues in the poem and the clues are in consecutive order; If you want to find the treasure chest, you have my book there, I'll tell you how to do it. Read the book just normally, the poem and the rest of the book, then go back and read the poem 6,8,10 times, study every line, every word, then after you do that read the book again slowly with the idea of looking for clues or hints that are in the book that will help you follow the clues. You can find the chest with just the clues, but there are hints in the book that will help you with the clues." ff -- Report From Santa Fe with Lorene Mills(May 13-16th 2011).

"What I tell people to do…if you’re really serious about looking for the treasure…get ‘The Thrill of the Chase’ and read it and then go back and read the poem over and over and over again. And then go back and read the book again, but slowly looking at every little abstract thing that might catch up in your brain, that might be a hint to help you with the clues. Any part of some is better than no part of any.” ff -- Moby Dickens Book Shop in Taos/11-2-13.

I really see that as saying the same thing I did, except it is a little bit more buried in his statement.
He says "You can find the chest with just the clues, but there are hints in the book that will help you with the clues."

So like I said you can find the chest using just the clues in the poem.
The hints in the book, if you can find and decipher those, will help you with the clues.
Whether or not that speeds things up, slows things down, makes things easier or more difficult depends on whether or not you're able to solve the clues in the poem very easily and whether or not you are able to find the hints you need while reading the book, or you end up going down a hundred different rabbit holes by reading the book.
I really don't see those statements as tipping the scales one way or the other, the argument is still the same.

I believe f’s statements do tip the scales towards the hints route being easier. If I’m wrong, oh well. Lol

When someone, who is an expert on a subject, explains their best advice for tackling a problem I’d think there’s a good reason why that is their best advice. It could simply be that f thinks that the hints are easier to figure out (and hence the correct starting point to clue 1) than finding the correct starting point from the poem. That is a common sense answer as to why the hints route may be easier. That’s all it takes to tip the scales in the favor of the hints for me because you don’t hear often the huge amount of rabbit holes that exist with just trying to figure out the poem by itself. That number, or time, is greater, imo.

That is a fine argument.
The other side of the argument is the shortest distance between two points is a straight line.
If you are able to solve the poem without the need for the book(s),scrapbooks,etc., that is the quickest route to getting to the tc.
Maybe time will tell.
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