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The first stanza as an introduction
01-11-2018, 12:47 PM, (This post was last modified: 01-11-2018, 01:59 PM by Skipper.)
#1
The first stanza as an introduction
All,

What is the purpose of the poem?

“So I wrote a poem containing nine clues that if followed precisely, will lead to the end of my rainbow and the treasure:” f

Based on that line, prior to the poem, is it not easy to infer that its purpose is to lead us, albeit cryptically, to the end of Forrest’s rainbow and the treasure?

Then with that said: if the “first” clue is: Begin it where warm waters….., then what is the purpose of the first stanza?

Now for those who don’t know, I am of the opinion that each of the nine sentences are the nine clues, therefore the first sentence, the entire first stanza is, in my opinion, a clue (none of that matters if one can figure out what the poems words mean and circumstance to the treasure). But as I have mentioned many times, it may not be one that get us "physically" closer, but possibly "mentally", in the idea that it tells us what is to come, e.g. an introduction: its purpose being to act as a beginning section which states the purpose and goals of the following writing, the remaining five stanzas. And again what is the purpose of the poem, but to lead us to the end of Forrest’s rainbow and the treasure.

So you must ask yourself what does the first stanza tell us?

"As I have gone alone in there and with my treasures bold, I can keep my secret where, and hint of riches new and old."

"Some say they are trying to think outside the box, as if the solution lies somewhere out there." f

Seannm
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01-11-2018, 02:00 PM,
#2
RE: The first stanza as an introduction
The first stanza alerts readers that the author has hidden a treasure in a secret place, and that he is going to give clues about it.
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01-11-2018, 02:09 PM, (This post was last modified: 01-11-2018, 02:11 PM by Skipper.)
#3
RE: The first stanza as an introduction
(01-11-2018, 02:00 PM)dude here Wrote: The first stanza alerts readers that the author has hidden a treasure in a secret place, and that he is going to give clues about it.
Dude here,

Sure, and that may be a consensus thought, but that could easily be inferred if he had simply said:

As I have gone alone there I can keep my secret where, and hint of riches.

But he did not.

Seannm
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01-11-2018, 02:50 PM,
#4
RE: The first stanza as an introduction
(01-11-2018, 02:09 PM)Skipper Wrote:
(01-11-2018, 02:00 PM)dude here Wrote: The first stanza alerts readers that the author has hidden a treasure in a secret place, and that he is going to give clues about it.
Dude here,

Sure, and that may be a consensus thought, but that could easily be inferred if he had simply said:

As I have gone alone there I can keep my secret where, and hint of riches.

But he did not.

Seannm

Just because he says, “So I wrote a poem containing nine clues that if followed precisely, will lead to the end of my rainbow and the treasure:” f external to the poem, doesn't mean the poem can't reiterate it.

He has to say the above quote external to the poem, if he didn't it would be like no opening ceremony to the olympics; okay maybe not that big but you get the point. He uses the opening stanza to describe the chase in much the same way as part of the quote, just more poetically.

The poem is a stand alone document the first stanza is the lead-in/intro; it's telling you why you are reading the rest of the poem, what you are looking for, etc. I'm no literature/poetry expert but I think you have to have an intro.

Also, I think when writing poems there are certain rules to follow about filling stanzas, verses, metre, rhyming, other boring things that put me to sleep in English class.
There may be more hidden meaning in the first stanza, but I think the obvious reasons for it are still legit.

".... When these guys are making a mistake I don’t want to interrupt them." -ff
You Should Know By Now:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PAm2wBoKsAE
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01-11-2018, 03:29 PM,
#5
RE: The first stanza as an introduction
(01-11-2018, 02:09 PM)Skipper Wrote:
(01-11-2018, 02:00 PM)dude here Wrote: The first stanza alerts readers that the author has hidden a treasure in a secret place, and that he is going to give clues about it.
Dude here,

Sure, and that may be a consensus thought, but that could easily be inferred if he had simply said:

As I have gone alone there I can keep my secret where, and hint of riches.

But he did not.

Seannm

Sure, the stanza might contain hints, but the nine contiguous clues that you need to follow precisely start in the second stanza.
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01-11-2018, 04:41 PM,
#6
RE: The first stanza as an introduction
(01-11-2018, 12:47 PM)Skipper Wrote: Now for those who don’t know, I am of the opinion that each of the nine sentences are the nine clues, therefore the first sentence, the entire first stanza is, in my opinion, a clue...

I am of this opinion also. I think that the stanza may circumscribe the search area...i.e., narrow it down from "in the Rockies" and "north of Santa Fe."

I think that words "alone", "treasures", "bold", "keep", "secret", "hint", "riches" and "new and old" all point to a specific place.

Just my way of looking at it, right now.
-Barbara
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01-12-2018, 01:22 PM,
#7
RE: The first stanza as an introduction
IMO, of course - The poem and it's clues work on several levels. The first level is referring to the poem itself and how to read it in order to get to the next levels to solve it. The puzzle maker and poet gives us a hint in the introduction to the poem: “So (I wrote a poem containing nine clues that) if followed precisely, will lead to the end of my rainbow and the treasure:” “So... if followed precisely, will lead to the end of my rainbow and the treasure:”

The first stanza follows, beginning with the word "As". “As above, so below - This phrase comes from the beginning of The Emerald Tablet and embraces the entire system of traditional and modern magic which was inscribed upon the tablet in cryptic wording by Hermes Trismegistus. The significance of this phrase is that it is believed to hold the key to all mysteries.”

Forrest has told us several times that in order to solve the poem you need to know where to start. The first stanza tells us "the secret where" to start - the word "so" found at the beginning of stanza 5, then again at the beginning of stanza 6. Then again at the beginning of stanza 1 ("asi" is the Spanish word for "so" - as above so below). We have been given the path to follow in the poem in order to solve it. Stanza 5. then 6, then 1. We are now at the beginning of stanza 2 and ready to move to the next level, so he tells us "Begin it where..." .

“It is interesting to know that a great number of people are out there searching. Many are giving serious thought to the clues in my poem, but only a few are in tight focus with a word that is key.”
“So... if followed precisely, will lead to the end of my rainbow and the treasure:”
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