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Simplify
01-16-2018, 03:20 PM,
#11
RE: Simplify
Maybe the poem is meant to be read from bottom to top??? Smile
Reply
01-16-2018, 03:45 PM,
#12
RE: Simplify
(01-16-2018, 03:06 PM)fundamental design Wrote:
(01-16-2018, 02:10 PM)FennMaster Wrote:
(01-16-2018, 01:56 PM)illinoisghost Wrote:
(01-15-2018, 11:31 PM)Chris Yates Wrote:
(01-15-2018, 11:12 PM)crazyfamily Wrote: Oh, allow me to rephrase. People who stick with the "everything you need is in the poem" malarkey will realize that easier doesn't mean easy to someone who hid a million dollar treasure.

you need to pick and choose your malarkey better


Everything you need can’t be in the poem otherwise this statement by f would not have been posted
[Image: 2c8109b58c8ab09cbd3c69147ff2f820.jpg]


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Or you just couldn't "reasonably" expect to find the treasure if you didn't know it was in the Rocky Mountains north of Santa Fe, or 9 clues in poem, etc.

No one has found it yet and everyone knows it is in the Rocky Mountains north of Santa Fe, poem has 9 clues, etc.

Imagine not knowing the poem has 9 clues ...

Or as some believe the first stanza is an introduction (contains backstory) then when that’s taken out of the equation you’re screwed.

Not knowing the poem has 9 clues doesn’t seem to me to be a big deal. Certainly many searchers figured out begin= begin. Not too hard to take a stab at cease= cease.

Yes, but knowing it is a treasure hunt may be considered part of the back story that made you look for the first clue. Also, the 9 clues is a big deal, it is a huge confirmation that you have the correct solve.

Anyway, without the back story it is just a poem. Someone could conceivably figure out that it is describing some sort of journey and that there may be treasure involved. But they still wouldn't know it was in the Rocky Mountains, so now you have, if not the entire globe, at least the entire United States to search. Virtually no chance of finding it in that large of a search area. It seems very far fetched that given those circumstances anyone would ever find the tc.

".... When these guys are making a mistake I don’t want to interrupt them." -ff
You Should Know By Now:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PAm2wBoKsAE
Reply
01-16-2018, 03:58 PM,
#13
RE: Simplify
I'm starting to wonder if the poem tells you diddly squat and the book it the route to go!
Reply
01-16-2018, 04:05 PM,
#14
RE: Simplify
(01-16-2018, 03:58 PM)Copper Wrote: I'm starting to wonder if the poem tells you diddly squat and the book it the route to go!

Maybe, maybe!

Captions! (Look at the trees)

Smile
Mindy's blogs:

http://www.fennhotspot.com
http://www.myeverwonderland.blogspot.com
Reply
01-16-2018, 04:07 PM,
#15
RE: Simplify
His simplify statement has made me reconsider a lot of things. We are ALL over thinking it to death.
Reply
01-17-2018, 06:58 AM, (This post was last modified: 01-17-2018, 08:20 AM by fundamental design.)
#16
RE: Simplify
(01-16-2018, 03:45 PM)FennMaster Wrote:
(01-16-2018, 03:06 PM)fundamental design Wrote:
(01-16-2018, 02:10 PM)FennMaster Wrote:
(01-16-2018, 01:56 PM)illinoisghost Wrote:
(01-15-2018, 11:31 PM)Chris Yates Wrote: you need to pick and choose your malarkey better


Everything you need can’t be in the poem otherwise this statement by f would not have been posted
[Image: 2c8109b58c8ab09cbd3c69147ff2f820.jpg]


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Or you just couldn't "reasonably" expect to find the treasure if you didn't know it was in the Rocky Mountains north of Santa Fe, or 9 clues in poem, etc.

No one has found it yet and everyone knows it is in the Rocky Mountains north of Santa Fe, poem has 9 clues, etc.

Imagine not knowing the poem has 9 clues ...

Or as some believe the first stanza is an introduction (contains backstory) then when that’s taken out of the equation you’re screwed.

Not knowing the poem has 9 clues doesn’t seem to me to be a big deal. Certainly many searchers figured out begin= begin. Not too hard to take a stab at cease= cease.

Yes, but knowing it is a treasure hunt may be considered part of the back story that made you look for the first clue. Also, the 9 clues is a big deal, it is a huge confirmation that you have the correct solve.

Anyway, without the back story it is just a poem. Someone could conceivably figure out that it is describing some sort of journey and that there may be treasure involved. But they still wouldn't know it was in the Rocky Mountains, so now you have, if not the entire globe, at least the entire United States to search. Virtually no chance of finding it in that large of a search area. It seems very far fetched that given those circumstances anyone would ever find the tc.

Your first paragraph doesn’t preclude there being sufficient backstory in stanza one of the poem for one person out of 20 billion people in the future to figure it out...that’s all it takes.

It also doesn’t matter that you don’t know it’s in the Rocky Mountains from outside the poem. If someone can unlock the possibility of the first stanza leading to somewhere specific in the Rocky Mountains then that’s what counts. They wouldn’t be worried about the whole globe if they unravel the possible riddle in stanza one. That is to say, if you can figure out that the poem has a riddle then that is where it all begins. Then just work the poem to figure out the solution to the riddle. The poem will show you the way.
-.-..The keeper of the key
Reply
01-17-2018, 10:43 AM,
#17
RE: Simplify
(01-17-2018, 06:58 AM)fundamental design Wrote:
(01-16-2018, 03:45 PM)FennMaster Wrote:
(01-16-2018, 03:06 PM)fundamental design Wrote:
(01-16-2018, 02:10 PM)FennMaster Wrote:
(01-16-2018, 01:56 PM)illinoisghost Wrote: Everything you need can’t be in the poem otherwise this statement by f would not have been posted
[Image: 2c8109b58c8ab09cbd3c69147ff2f820.jpg]


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Or you just couldn't "reasonably" expect to find the treasure if you didn't know it was in the Rocky Mountains north of Santa Fe, or 9 clues in poem, etc.

No one has found it yet and everyone knows it is in the Rocky Mountains north of Santa Fe, poem has 9 clues, etc.

Imagine not knowing the poem has 9 clues ...

Or as some believe the first stanza is an introduction (contains backstory) then when that’s taken out of the equation you’re screwed.

Not knowing the poem has 9 clues doesn’t seem to me to be a big deal. Certainly many searchers figured out begin= begin. Not too hard to take a stab at cease= cease.

Yes, but knowing it is a treasure hunt may be considered part of the back story that made you look for the first clue. Also, the 9 clues is a big deal, it is a huge confirmation that you have the correct solve.

Anyway, without the back story it is just a poem. Someone could conceivably figure out that it is describing some sort of journey and that there may be treasure involved. But they still wouldn't know it was in the Rocky Mountains, so now you have, if not the entire globe, at least the entire United States to search. Virtually no chance of finding it in that large of a search area. It seems very far fetched that given those circumstances anyone would ever find the tc.

Your first paragraph doesn’t preclude there being sufficient backstory in stanza one of the poem for one person out of 20 billion people in the future to figure it out...that’s all it takes.

It also doesn’t matter that you don’t know it’s in the Rocky Mountains from outside the poem. If someone can unlock the possibility of the first stanza leading to somewhere specific in the Rocky Mountains then that’s what counts. They wouldn’t be worried about the whole globe if they unravel the possible riddle in stanza one. That is to say, if you can figure out that the poem has a riddle then that is where it all begins. Then just work the poem to figure out the solution to the riddle. The poem will show you the way.

They won't know that the first stanza's is referring to a place in the Rocky Mountains, it is too vague. Knowledge of it being in the Rocky Mountains comes first then the alleged riddle of where it begins in the Rocky Mountains. Without knowing first that it is in the Rocky Mountains, odds of finding it are almost zero.

".... When these guys are making a mistake I don’t want to interrupt them." -ff
You Should Know By Now:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PAm2wBoKsAE
Reply
01-17-2018, 11:21 AM,
#18
RE: Simplify
People would not have a reasonable chance of finding it without the big hint (that it's in the Rockies north of SF). It's already very difficult; you have to solve a lot of clues (9), and each clue could be interpreted in numerous ways. It's possible, but not reasonable.
Reply
01-17-2018, 11:30 AM, (This post was last modified: 01-17-2018, 11:38 AM by fundamental design.)
#19
RE: Simplify
(01-17-2018, 10:43 AM)FennMaster Wrote:
(01-17-2018, 06:58 AM)fundamental design Wrote:
(01-16-2018, 03:45 PM)FennMaster Wrote:
(01-16-2018, 03:06 PM)fundamental design Wrote:
(01-16-2018, 02:10 PM)FennMaster Wrote: Or you just couldn't "reasonably" expect to find the treasure if you didn't know it was in the Rocky Mountains north of Santa Fe, or 9 clues in poem, etc.

No one has found it yet and everyone knows it is in the Rocky Mountains north of Santa Fe, poem has 9 clues, etc.

Imagine not knowing the poem has 9 clues ...

Or as some believe the first stanza is an introduction (contains backstory) then when that’s taken out of the equation you’re screwed.

Not knowing the poem has 9 clues doesn’t seem to me to be a big deal. Certainly many searchers figured out begin= begin. Not too hard to take a stab at cease= cease.

Yes, but knowing it is a treasure hunt may be considered part of the back story that made you look for the first clue. Also, the 9 clues is a big deal, it is a huge confirmation that you have the correct solve.

Anyway, without the back story it is just a poem. Someone could conceivably figure out that it is describing some sort of journey and that there may be treasure involved. But they still wouldn't know it was in the Rocky Mountains, so now you have, if not the entire globe, at least the entire United States to search. Virtually no chance of finding it in that large of a search area. It seems very far fetched that given those circumstances anyone would ever find the tc.

Your first paragraph doesn’t preclude there being sufficient backstory in stanza one of the poem for one person out of 20 billion people in the future to figure it out...that’s all it takes.

It also doesn’t matter that you don’t know it’s in the Rocky Mountains from outside the poem. If someone can unlock the possibility of the first stanza leading to somewhere specific in the Rocky Mountains then that’s what counts. They wouldn’t be worried about the whole globe if they unravel the possible riddle in stanza one. That is to say, if you can figure out that the poem has a riddle then that is where it all begins. Then just work the poem to figure out the solution to the riddle. The poem will show you the way.

They won't know that the first stanza's is referring to a place in the Rocky Mountains, it is too vague. Knowledge of it being in the Rocky Mountains comes first then the alleged riddle of where it begins in the Rocky Mountains. Without knowing first that it is in the Rocky Mountains, odds of finding it are almost zero.
The first stanza seems vague...that doesn’t mean that it is. Not worried about people who think the first stanza is vague. What we are talking about goes to if a person can figure out that there is a tc hidden somewhere and that it’s solvable to figure out where...we aren’t talking about people that can’t figure that out. Plenty of searchers started the hunt without knowing the tc was hidden specifically in the Rocky Mountains. You can’t change that.

A riddle in the poem could be self contained in providing enough cryptic information to solve it if you think the right things. It’s not a question of backstory or how many clues to solve the riddle. But that doesn’t mean f isn’t clever enough to envelope a possible riddle in the introduction/backstory of the poem.
-.-..The keeper of the key
Reply
01-17-2018, 11:38 AM,
#20
RE: Simplify
(01-17-2018, 11:30 AM)fundamental design Wrote:
(01-17-2018, 10:43 AM)FennMaster Wrote:
(01-17-2018, 06:58 AM)fundamental design Wrote:
(01-16-2018, 03:45 PM)FennMaster Wrote:
(01-16-2018, 03:06 PM)fundamental design Wrote: Or as some believe the first stanza is an introduction (contains backstory) then when that’s taken out of the equation you’re screwed.

Not knowing the poem has 9 clues doesn’t seem to me to be a big deal. Certainly many searchers figured out begin= begin. Not too hard to take a stab at cease= cease.

Yes, but knowing it is a treasure hunt may be considered part of the back story that made you look for the first clue. Also, the 9 clues is a big deal, it is a huge confirmation that you have the correct solve.

Anyway, without the back story it is just a poem. Someone could conceivably figure out that it is describing some sort of journey and that there may be treasure involved. But they still wouldn't know it was in the Rocky Mountains, so now you have, if not the entire globe, at least the entire United States to search. Virtually no chance of finding it in that large of a search area. It seems very far fetched that given those circumstances anyone would ever find the tc.

Your first paragraph doesn’t preclude there being sufficient backstory in stanza one of the poem for one person out of 20 billion people in the future to figure it out...that’s all it takes.

It also doesn’t matter that you don’t know it’s in the Rocky Mountains from outside the poem. If someone can unlock the possibility of the first stanza leading to somewhere specific in the Rocky Mountains then that’s what counts. They wouldn’t be worried about the whole globe if they unravel the possible riddle in stanza one. That is to say, if you can figure out that the poem has a riddle then that is where it all begins. Then just work the poem to figure out the solution to the riddle. The poem will show you the way.

They won't know that the first stanza's is referring to a place in the Rocky Mountains, it is too vague. Knowledge of it being in the Rocky Mountains comes first then the alleged riddle of where it begins in the Rocky Mountains. Without knowing first that it is in the Rocky Mountains, odds of finding it are almost zero.
The first stanza seems vague...that doesn’t mean that it is. Not worried about people who think the first stanza is vague. What we are talking about goes to if a person can figure out that there is a tc hidden somewhere...we aren’t talking about people that can’t figure that out. Plenty of searchers started the hunt without knowing the tc was hidden specifically in the Rocky Mountains. You can’t change that.

A riddle in the poem could be self contained in providing enough cryptic information to solve it if you think the right things. It’s not a question of backstory or how many clues to solve the riddle. But that doesn’t mean f isn’t clever enough to envelope a possible riddle in the introduction/backstory of the poem.

I think we should just agree to disagree.

Good Luck FD

".... When these guys are making a mistake I don’t want to interrupt them." -ff
You Should Know By Now:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PAm2wBoKsAE
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