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Make me an offer!
04-16-2018, 03:24 AM,
#11
RE: Make me an offer!
(04-15-2018, 11:40 AM)Beavertooth Wrote: Do me a favor and send the following message to Forrest before you explore that place:

"Dear Forrest,

Please do not feel bad about my death, and perhaps the death of my partner. It is not your fault! You warned all of us many times not to search in dangerous places. You said the chest is not in water. Many searchers have reminded me of these comments. But I was stubborn and refused to listen!

In these circumstances, you have to let Darwinism take its course. We need to "thin the herd" at times, and who better to volunteer than someone like myself with questionable judgment and a daredevil approach to high-risk situations.

Thank you Forrest for the Chase, and sleep well at night knowing that you tried to avoid these situations. You can only do so much.

Sincerely,

thrilledtochase"

R.I.P.
___________
P.S. Have you considered using an underwater camera or an underwater metal detector first?

Of this post the PS: was useful. Yes I have looked into rental of the proper equipment. I flew to the Rocky Mountains from Florida using only the poem as a map to find a hidden entrance to a totally undocumented mine entrance. None of the locals were aware of its existence. I found the entrance, discovered the Fenn mine took a peek inside and flew back to Florida. It took willpower not to just barrel in. I've waited for a year and am looking for someone to help do this right.
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04-16-2018, 11:54 AM,
#12
RE: Make me an offer!
[/quote]

Of this post the PS: was useful. Yes I have looked into rental of the proper equipment. I flew to the Rocky Mountains from Florida using only the poem as a map to find a hidden entrance to a totally undocumented mine entrance. None of the locals were aware of its existence. I found the entrance, discovered the Fenn mine took a peek inside and flew back to Florida. It took willpower not to just barrel in. I've waited for a year and am looking for someone to help do this right.
[/quote]

I am not a mine engineer but have been in many abandoned mines. I do have a few questions that may help others clarify what you are proposing:

1: Is it a mine shaft (vertical) or tunnel (horizontal)?

Mine shafts are possibly the most hazardous places in the rocky mountains often because they are not know. People die in them every year. If it is a shaft stay far away and report it to the appropriate state mining agency or BLM so they can close it for the safety of all.

If you are talking about a tunnel you should get someone with actual mining experience to go with you as there are many unseen and difficult to detect dangers. At the very least have one or more people with you in case there is trouble.

2: Are you sure it is undocumented. That would mean that no one ever filed a mining claim. That seems unlikely because no one would go to the trouble of digging a mine without a claim. Perhaps it was just an exploratory dig, but even before starting those a claim is usually filed, just in case. Without a claim filed the finder would not be entitled to any minerals they discovered. Just because locals are not aware of it does not mean anything. Many mines are dug without anyone else knowing about them (other than the mining claims office). Miners are often as secretive as Fenn Gold Hunters. Most states and the BLM keep records of mines and mining claims. They also publish them, mainly for safety reasons. An exception to the above are uranium mines in Eastern Utah/Western Colorado. That is because during the Uranium boom of the 1950's there were so many people making claims and digging mines the government could not verify the claims very well and often the filers were inaccurate in their identification of the actual location, no one was verifying where they were digging so they just put down a location that may or may not have been the actual mine site. I suspect it was that they didn't bother surveying the location as they just wanted to dig and sell the ore without taking the time or expense of determining where the actual mine was. If you go to those areas there are literally mines everywhere.

3: When you say flooded what do you mean? Some water in the bottom, filled to the top, stream of water running out...? Before tampering with a "flooded" mine you need to check on the regulations. The water in most flooded mines in the Rockies contain large amounts of very toxic minerals and chemicals. If even a small amount is released from its current location you could be subject to fines, damages and even prison. That of course is less of a concern than actually exposing yourself to the toxic waters that build up in mines.
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04-16-2018, 01:14 PM, (This post was last modified: 04-16-2018, 01:22 PM by thrilledtochase.)
#13
RE: Make me an offer!

Of this post the PS: was useful. Yes I have looked into rental of the proper equipment. I flew to the Rocky Mountains from Florida using only the poem as a map to find a hidden entrance to a totally undocumented mine entrance. None of the locals were aware of its existence. I found the entrance, discovered the Fenn mine took a peek inside and flew back to Florida. It took willpower not to just barrel in. I've waited for a year and am looking for someone to help do this right.
[/quote]

I am not a mine engineer but have been in many abandoned mines. I do have a few questions that may help others clarify what you are proposing:

1: Is it a mine shaft (vertical) or tunnel (horizontal)?

Mine shafts are possibly the most hazardous places in the rocky mountains often because they are not know. People die in them every year. If it is a shaft stay far away and report it to the appropriate state mining agency or BLM so they can close it for the safety of all.

If you are talking about a tunnel you should get someone with actual mining experience to go with you as there are many unseen and difficult to detect dangers. At the very least have one or more people with you in case there is trouble.

2: Are you sure it is undocumented. That would mean that no one ever filed a mining claim. That seems unlikely because no one would go to the trouble of digging a mine without a claim. Perhaps it was just an exploratory dig, but even before starting those a claim is usually filed, just in case. Without a claim filed the finder would not be entitled to any minerals they discovered. Just because locals are not aware of it does not mean anything. Many mines are dug without anyone else knowing about them (other than the mining claims office). Miners are often as secretive as Fenn Gold Hunters. Most states and the BLM keep records of mines and mining claims. They also publish them, mainly for safety reasons. An exception to the above are uranium mines in Eastern Utah/Western Colorado. That is because during the Uranium boom of the 1950's there were so many people making claims and digging mines the government could not verify the claims very well and often the filers were inaccurate in their identification of the actual location, no one was verifying where they were digging so they just put down a location that may or may not have been the actual mine site. I suspect it was that they didn't bother surveying the location as they just wanted to dig and sell the ore without taking the time or expense of determining where the actual mine was. If you go to those areas there are literally mines everywhere.

3: When you say flooded what do you mean? Some water in the bottom, filled to the top, stream of water running out...? Before tampering with a "flooded" mine you need to check on the regulations. The water in most flooded mines in the Rockies contain large amounts of very toxic minerals and chemicals. If even a small amount is released from its current location you could be subject to fines, damages and even prison. That of course is less of a concern than actually exposing yourself to the toxic waters that build up in mines.
[/quote]

Thank you so much for the meaningful reply. All excellent points. I have looked up the claims by available resources and can't seem to find anything; that being said the records might be in a dusty box in the towns city hall and not posted in the online database. As far as flooded I didn't go far into the shaft; so as to the depth of the water I certainly can't vouch. If I was to guess I would say maybe 12-24 inches of water. I would never drain the mine into the wilderness especially as there is a creek right next to it, although I easily could have done this with a shovel and a day or a dozen or so siphons. I definitely want someone with experience to help in this endeavor. I don't understand all the dangers, but at least I understand that I don't understand :) with regards to the mining claims as I understand it from a legal standpoint searching for abandoned property falls under different regulations than minerals or mining claims and the two areas can overlap and the fees and applications for legally extracting it are two separate enterprises. Oddly enough I am not the only one who has legally registered to search for abandoned property in this very small area.
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