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Where to start...
04-16-2018, 06:17 PM, (This post was last modified: 04-16-2018, 06:18 PM by Mindy.)
#21
Where to start...
(04-16-2018, 06:07 PM)Beavertooth Wrote:
(04-16-2018, 04:05 AM)Mindy Wrote: Isa Lake is definitely unique, and my heavy loads water high —Queens Laundry—isn’t far away.

HLWH- heavy loads— queen’s laundry
Water high- it’s a Geyser.

It fits. Kennings, ya know.

I don't want to rain on your parade, but ....

The Queen's Laundry stopped being a geyser (at least with regard to eruptions of water and steam into the air) around 1886. It is now considered a spring, not a geyser. So, no water high when Forrest spent summers there and no water high since.

The Queen's Laundry was originally named for the colorful clothes hanging in the trees as bathers took their clothes off to dip in a pool of runoff water from the original geyser. That bathing pool has disappeared in time. It may have been used to wash their clothes in a minor way. The partial building there that is on the National Historic Registry was intended to be primarily a bathhouse, with a second section (never finished) that some believe was going to be a laundry that never happened. So, no heavy loads either, other than imputed by the name.

"But while the pool itself is beautiful, it’s the odd log structure that really draws visitors. For that, you can thank Philetus Norris, Yellowstone’s second official superintendent. Indeed, it was Norris and his party who officially (re)christened the feature. From Norris, as quoted in Whittlesey:

"during a Sabbath’s rest and bathing recreation, some of the boys crossed from our camp to the attractive bordered pools below this great boiling fountain, and in one cool enough for bathing discovered its matchless cleansing properties, and from the long lines of bright-colored clothing soon seen drying upon the adjacent stumps and branches, while their owners were gamboling like dolphins in the pools, the envious cooks and other camp attaches dubbed it the Laundry, with a variety of prefixes, of which that which I deemed the most appropriate adheres, and hence the name Queen’s Laundry" (1883, p. 252).

"Early visitors to Yellowstone were no strangers to bathing in thermal waters, but the Laundry marked the first time in the Park’s history of someone consciously developing a hot spring-fed laundry/bath. Indeed, in the fall of 1881, Norris began construction on a two-room facility—one room for bathing, one room for a laundry.

Alas for Norris, his Laundry was never finished. When Norris was replaced as superintendent between 1881 and 1882, his plans went with him, according to historian Aubrey Haines, writing in volume 1 of The Yellowstone Story:

This peculiar little structure still stands on the sinter slope below the Queen’s Laundry Spring. The roof has fallen in, but the wall logs have become so heavily impregnated with mineral from the hot spring waters, during the intervening years, that they remain quite sound. One room had evidently been fitted up for bathing, as there is evidence of a trough for leading hot water in through the rear wall, but the other room was never completed; in fact, the doorway into it was never cut out. And there the Queen’s Laundry bathhouse stands today, an interesting relic of the administration of the Park’s second superintendent, and the first government building constructed specifically for the use of the public in any national park.

While the laundry has been left to stand and become more siliceous, and is today listed on the National Register of Historic Places, it was almost torn down. According to the NRHP, Yellowstone officials proposed removing the structure in 1964. They decided to let it stand, however, as a reminder of Yellowstone National Park’s beginnings."

The wikipedia article about the building and spring do not even mention the use as an actual laundry.

Consequently, this location may be useful as a heavy loads and waters high clue, but I think it is a stretch -- especially the waters high. YMMV


Good info.

Queen’s Laundry came about as my HLWH by way of imagination. Because a queen, as you might imagine, would have a ton of laundry, being a queen and all. Smile

However, it’s not my imagination that F references laundry—a lot.

Washington is also a good HLWH.
And Chinaman Laundry or something like that near Queen’s Laundry is good too.

In my imagination.



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Mindy's blogs:

http://www.fennhotspot.com
http://www.myeverwonderland.blogspot.com
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04-17-2018, 10:01 AM, (This post was last modified: 04-17-2018, 10:11 AM by realistrealist.)
#22
RE: Where to start...
I'm in the party of "quest to cease" meaning "quest two C's" for Cooke City.

Also, the chances of you needing to "begin" on a lake or some other large body of water seems unlikely. If I'm following the directions precisely, I need to be capable of beginning at the point or place where warm waters physically halts/stops. The simplest understanding for the first line to me then would be: "Where can both myself and warm waters halt?" Beginning there implies I have stopped there and I am starting from a resting position. It's a little riddle.
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04-17-2018, 10:44 AM,
#23
RE: Where to start...
(04-17-2018, 10:01 AM)realistrealist Wrote: I'm in the party of "quest to cease" meaning "quest two C's" for Cooke City.

Also, the chances of you needing to "begin" on a lake or some other large body of water seems unlikely. If I'm following the directions precisely, I need to be capable of beginning at the point or place where warm waters physically halts/stops. The simplest understanding for the first line to me then would be: "Where can both myself and warm waters halt?" Beginning there implies I have stopped there and I am starting from a resting position. It's a little riddle.

Isa Lake is the size of a pond with widened road shoulders to park at. After the construction, they may have added a small/tiny parking lot. I haven't Google Earthed it in years, but give it a try. The lake is at Craig Pass.

Also, I think I mentioned "heavy loads and water high" as a key possibility for this location. So don't be so quick to dismiss it.

Some searchers have used the Continental Divide as a possible WWWH (due to atmospheric flow, precipitation, "rain shadow", high altitude condensing warm moisture and causing it to rain, etc), as long as you can pick a certain spot along it. Isa Lake is a key candidate in that regard, and it certainly is one of the more interesting aberrations in the Rocky Mountains.
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04-17-2018, 10:51 AM,
#24
RE: Where to start...
(04-17-2018, 10:01 AM)realistrealist Wrote: ...Also, the chances of you needing to "begin" on a lake or some other large body of water seems unlikely. If I'm following the directions precisely, I need to be capable of beginning at the point or place where warm waters physically halts/stops. The simplest understanding for the first line to me then would be: "Where can both myself and warm waters halt?" Beginning there implies I have stopped there and I am starting from a resting position. It's a little riddle.

I think this is very good thinking. Good luck!
I think that will do the trick!
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04-17-2018, 10:51 AM,
#25
RE: Where to start...
(04-17-2018, 10:44 AM)Beavertooth Wrote:
(04-17-2018, 10:01 AM)realistrealist Wrote: I'm in the party of "quest to cease" meaning "quest two C's" for Cooke City.

Also, the chances of you needing to "begin" on a lake or some other large body of water seems unlikely. If I'm following the directions precisely, I need to be capable of beginning at the point or place where warm waters physically halts/stops. The simplest understanding for the first line to me then would be: "Where can both myself and warm waters halt?" Beginning there implies I have stopped there and I am starting from a resting position. It's a little riddle.

Isa Lake is the size of a pond with widened road shoulders to park at. After the construction, they may have added a small/tiny parking lot. I haven't Google Earthed it in years, but give it a try. The lake is at Craig Pass.

Also, I think I mentioned "heavy loads and water high" as a key possibility for this location. So don't be so quick to dismiss it.

Some searchers have used the Continental Divide as a possible WWWH (due to atmospheric flow, precipitation, "rain shadow", high altitude condensing warm moisture and causing it to rain, etc), as long as you can pick a certain spot along it. Isa Lake is a key candidate in that regard, and it certainly is one of the more interesting aberrations in the Rocky Mountains.

The Leeward side of the divide is where you want to end up.
Mindy's blogs:

http://www.fennhotspot.com
http://www.myeverwonderland.blogspot.com
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